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    William Barr Tag

    There is a lot of litigation regarding election fraud. Some of it is significant, some of it small ball, but it all needs to work it's way through the legal system. The allegations are serious and pervasive; whether they are successful remains to be seen.

    On September 2, President Donald Trump directed his administration to investigate New York City, Portland, Seattle, and Washington, DC, to see if they should pull federal money due to the violence and destruction. The Department of Justice announced this morning it has designated New York City, Portland, and Seattle "as jurisdictions permitting violence and destruction of property."

    The Department of Justice, after concluding that the prosecution of Michael Flynn was the product of misconduct by FBI and DOJ officials, moved to drop the case against Flynn. But not so fast. Flynn pleaded guilty, a plea that the DOJ motion to drop the charges calls into question. A judge has discretion whether to allow a case to be dropped, but normally if the prosecution doesn't want to prosecute, a judge will not force a prosecution. But where a guilty plea has been entered and accepted by the court, and a motion to withdraw the plea rejected by the court, the court has a lot more power because the prosecution, in a sense, is over already. Only sentencing remains.

    Attorney General William Barr has signaled that the federal government will take action with regard to violations of the constitutional rights of citizens by state and local officials as part of Wuhan coronavirus 'stay at home' and shutdown orders. Barr was addressing particularly violations of religious freedom.

    Some local and state governments have tried to ban religious services, including drive-in Easter services, even though conducted in accordance with CDC 'social distancing' guidelines. It's government power grabs for the sake of power grabs. We highlighted this past weekend how a federal judge barred Kentucky from such anti-religious action, Federal Court Prohibits Louisville Mayor from Banning Easter Sunday Drive-in Church Service:
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