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Trump Press Relations Tag

Yesterday it was all about the Mueller report and the Barr letter. Today the news and commentary seems to be focusing more on the press itself: will the MSM ever own up to the magnitude of their mistake/lies (I very much doubt it)? How much has their coverage of Russiagate damaged their reputation, and with whom? And do they even recognize how much this has damaged their reputation? What will their next move be?

The title of this article by Holman Jenkins intrigued me: "Politicians Never Lied Before Trump," and so I clicked on it. I was almost certain that the title was sarcastic---of course, politicians lie often, and have done so since time immemorial---and sure enough, the title was indeed meant as sarcasm. It seems completely obvious to me that one of the most common activities of politicians is to lie. To some extent, politics almost demands it, depending on how one defines "lie." Is a bragging exaggeration a lie? Is an optimistic promise a lie? How exaggerated does it have to be before it becomes a lie rather than mere hyperbole?

Media bias against Republicans has always existed but has reached a new high in the age of Trump. Talking heads on cable news frequently blur the lines between news and opinion. Supposed journalists openly root against Trump and for his opponents. It has gotten so bad that even Jill Abramson, the former executive editor of the New York Times is calling out the "paper of record" over bias.

Jim Acosta and CNN were granted a Temporary Restraining Order on Friday, November 16, 2018, restoring Acosta's White House "hard pass," to allow him privileged access to the White House grounds for press briefings and other events, pending further court action. The White House promptly announced that it would promulgate rules governing press conduct and discipline, to address the court's concern that Acosta was not afforded due process.

On Friday, November 16, 2018, the federal District Court in D.C. granted a temporary restraining order compelling the White House to reinstate CNN's Jim Acosta's "hard pass," that gives him privileged access to the White House for press briefings and events. As described in our coverage of the decision, there is no written opinion or transcript as of now that can be reviewed to understand the precise parameters and reasoning of the judge. As of this writing, we only have media reports as to the judge's stated reasons.
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