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    Rasmieh Odeh Tag

    Rasmea Odeh, a military member of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, was convicted in 1970 in Israel for the 1969 bombing of the SuperSol supermarket that killed two Hebrew University students, Edward Joffe and Leon Kanner. Rasmea also was convicted of the attempted bombing of the British consulate. Rasmea faces a re-trial in May 2017 on immigration fraud charges, based on her failing to disclose her convictions and imprisonment for the bombings, and her involvement with a terrorist group. Despite the overwhelming evidence of Rasmea's involvement in the supermarket bombing, including video statements for pro-Palestinian documentary films by Rasmea's two co-conspirators, Jewish Voice for Peace has been one of Rasmea's strongest supporters.

    Hotel Kaiserwasser and Hotel Regina in Vienna, Austria, have canceled a BDS event by a British-Palestinian lawyer. News agency Heute.at reported that Hotel Kaiserwasser canceled the event due to charges of antisemitism and one employee received threats by the Jewish community. Some have disputed this:
    “Nonsense,” said Raimund Fastenbauer, general-secretary of the 7,000-member Vienna Jewish community, adding that he informed the hotel about the “antisemitic character of BDS” movement targeting the Jewish state. The Hotel said it canceled the event due to “operational unfeasability,” according to Heute.at. Fastenbauer told the news site, “Nazis demanded, ‘Don’t buy from Jews,’ BDS formulates the [Nazi] demand in a similar way today.”

    Rasmea Odeh will be a featured speaker at the 2017 annual meeting of Jewish Voice for Peace in Chicago, March 31st – April 2nd. The invitation has created controversy, particularly after Rasmea's involvement in the March 8, 2017, International Women's Strike and Day Without A Woman created widespread media attention. The JVP invite has been covered widely, including at Algemeiner, Jerusalem Post, Chicago Tribune, Daily Caller, Washington Free Beacon, and The Tower, among others. ADL also has commented on the invitation. Rasmea is listed as one of the featured speakers, on a Who's Who list of anti-Israel activists (image below is only partial list).

    Some schools across the country will close on March 8,  the same day as the Day Without a Woman March, due to concerns they'll be short-staffed. The Chapel Hill-Carrboro schools in North Carolina will close. Durham Public Schools may close but have not reached a final decision. Chapel Hill-Carrboro Superintendent Jim Causby has decided to make March 8 a teacher workday and students will not have to make up the day:
    “The expected absences would make it difficult to teach students on March 8 and to provide essential services including transportation and food service,” the school system said in an emailed statement Thursday.

    The so-called "Day Without A Woman" strike scheduled for March 8 was first conceived by a group of extremists under the banner of the International Women's Strike, through a call to action posted in The Guardian newspaper, Women of America: we're going on strike. Join us so Trump will see our power:
    As a first step, we propose to help build an international strike against male violence and in defense of reproductive rights on 8 March. In this, we join with feminist groups from around 30 countries who have called for such a strike.... The women’s marches of 21 January have shown that in the United States, too, a new feminist movement may be in the making. It is important not to lose momentum.

    Snopes developed a reputation as a highly reliable debunker of internet hoaxes. It was one of the first sources I used to turn to. Now I find it often reads more like PolitiFact, a supposedly neutral fact checker that seems to lean left, or at least often seems to have a political angle on a fact check. I had noticed a change in Snopes a while ago, and even considered writing about it earlier, but Snopes coverage of Rasmea Odeh pushed me to a response. Rasmea has been in the news lately because of her involvement in launching the March 8 so-called Day Without A Woman.

    March 8 is being organized as "A Day Without A Woman," and promoted by the people behind the highly-organized Women's March. The March 8 protest asks women not to work and to otherwise go on strike. It was conceived by a small group of radicals, including convicted terrorist murderer Rasmea Odeh. Rasmea was one of the first female military members of the marxist terrorist group the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine.

    On February 12, 2017, we reported on the next phase of the so-called Women's March, Women’s March calls for General Strike and Day Without A Women. In that post, we called attention to the fact that Rasmea Odeh was one of the organizers, along with other radicals like Angela Davis, via Algemeiner:
    A convicted Palestinian terrorist was among the eight feminist activists who called earlier this week on American women to join a March 8 international strike — which organizers are calling a protest “against male violence and in defense of reproductive rights.” ….

    Yesterday I posted about a flurry of motions in the re-trial of Rasmea Odeh for immigration fraud. I focused on the prosecutor's motion to take the testimony in the West Bank of Rasmea's two co-conspirators in the bombing of the SuperSol supermarket in 1969, Prosecutors seek testimony of Rasmea Odeh bombing co-conspirators. That post has extensive background on the case, so please head over to the link if you are not yet familiar.

    Rasmea Odeh is rising to prominence in radical circles in the U.S. In addition to injecting her anti-Israel activism into Black Lives Matter protests, which we previously covered, Rasmea is part of a group organizing a planned "national strike" of women in March 2017, to protest Donald Trump. Rasmea also has been fully embraced by the anti-Israel Jewish Voice for Peace, which has supported her for a long time and which is featuring her on a panel at JVP's upcoming annual conference.

    This is getting good. The Women's March had a good turnout. But even if you use the wildest stats, it turned out about 2.5 million people nationwide, or less than 1 percent of the population. And that was under incredibly favorable circumstances -- a Saturday so no one had to miss work, the day after the Inauguration, glowing media fawning, and a coalition of several dozen organizing groups including unions, who provided buses and other logistical support.

    We recently reported on important developments in the immigration fraud trial of convicted supermarket bomber and murderer Rasmea Odeh. Specifically, the prosecutors obtained a Superseding Indictment which expanded the grounds upon which to convict Rasmea of the single charge of falsely obtaining naturalization. The prosecution signaled, in those new allegations, that it would seek a conviction not just because Rasmea falsely denied prior convictions and imprisonment (the prior grounds), but also that she lied on immigration forms about being associated with a terrorist group, the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine. See these posts for background:

    We recently reported that a Superseding Indictment was filed against Rasmea Odeh, the convicted terrorist who faces re-trial on an immigration fraud charge. Rasmea  was convicted in Israel in 1970 of the 1969 bombing of the SuperSol supermarket in Jerusalem that killed two Hebrew University students, Edward Joffe and Leon Kanner. Rasmea also was convicted of the attempted bombing of the British Consulate. Rasmea was released in 1979 in a prisoner exchange for an Israeli soldier captured in Lebanon. Rasmea made her way to the U.S. in the mid-1990s, where she lied on her visa application by denying any prior convictions or imprisonment, and again in her 2003 naturalization application when she repeated the same false answer.

    The prosecution of Rasmea Odeh started out quite simply. Rasmea signed a naturalization form that denies she "EVER" (bold and CAPS in original) was convicted or imprisoned. That was a lie. Rasmea was convicted in 1970 in Israel of the 1969 bombing of a supermarket in Jerusalem in which two students were killed, and attempted bombing of the British Consulate. In the first trial, the judge did not allow Rasmea to relitigate the Israeli conviction with good reason -- whether the conviction was correct or not, the conviction and subsequent imprisonment were facts that had to be disclosed in response to the questions. The questions did not ask whether Rasmea "justly" or "rightly" or "fairly" was convicted or imprisoned, so the propriety of the conviction was not legally relevant.

    We reported the other day how Rasmea Odeh gets new trial in immigration fraud case. Rasmea  is the terrorist member of the military wing of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine who was convicted in Israel in 1970 of the 1969 bombing of the SuperSol supermarket in Jerusalem that killed two Hebrew University students, Edward Joffe and Leon Kanner. Rasmea also was convicted of the attempted bombing of the British Consulate. Rasmea was released in 1979 in a prisoner exchange for an Israeli soldier captured in Lebanon. Rasmea made her way to the U.S. in the mid-1990s, where she lied on her visa application by denying any prior convictions or imprisonment, and again in her 2003 naturalization application when she repeated the same false answer. For more background, and how Rasmea’s supporters have distorted history, see Rasmea Odeh rightly convicted of Israeli supermarket bombing and U.S. immigration fraud and Rasmea Odeh’s victims – then and now.

    In a development I predicted but hoped would not happen, convicted terrorist murderer Rasmea Odeh has been granted a new trial on immigration fraud charges alleging she knowingly lied on visa and naturalization applications by denying her conviction and imprisonment. The new trial was granted because the trial court decided to allow an expert to testify that Rasmea suffered from PTSD at the time of the false answers, and that the PTSD caused Rasmea to "filter" questions as to whether she "EVER" (bold and CAPS in original) was convicted or imprisoned. Rasmea answered No to such questions, and now claims that her PTSD made her interpret the word EVER to mean since arriving in the U.S. in the 1990s.
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