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Frontier Lab Tag

Anne Sorock of The Frontier Lab started writing for Legal Insurrection in April 2012 and was a regular contributor for many years. Over time Anne focused more and more of her time at The Frontier Lab, and now writes for us only sporadically. Anne uses "deep values" research rather than polling and superficial surveys. In November 2016, just after Trump's victory, I wrote about how Anne was the first person I'm aware of to predict a Trump victory ... in February 2015, Research Guru saw Trump phenomenon coming before anyone else:

For most people, both Donald Trump's campaign and success came out of nowhere. But not for Anne Sorock of The Frontier Lab. Anne started writing for Legal Insurrection in April 2012 and was a regular contributor for many years. Over time Anne focused more and more of her time at The Frontier Lab, and now writes for us only sporadically. We have featured Anne's research at The Frontier Lab many times. Anne uses the Deep Values methodology she learned while interacting with the Food & Brand Lab at Cornell University while getting her MBA. Deep values research seeks to understand not just what consumers like or want, but what deeply held values lead to such decisions.

Yesterday I published details on Anne Sorock's Research Report: #BlackLivesMatter more about radical social upheaval than “Black Lives”. I mentioned in the post how Anne uses the Deep Values methodology she learned while interacting with the Food & Brand Lab at Cornell University while getting her MBA. Deep values research seeks to understand not just what consumers like or want, but what deeply held values lead to such decisions. At the Frontier Lab, Anne has applied deep values methodology to numerous political topics, including  why people decide to become politically activeOccupy movement participants’ motivations, and why Republicans won’t call themselves Republican, among others. I also mentioned that Anne had applied that methodology several years ago to understanding why Legal Insurrection readers read Legal Insurrection, and that I might share those findings with you.

If you think the Black Lives Matter movement is just or even primarily about "Black Lives," then you don't understand the movement. A new research report, based on detailed interviews with those active in the movement, demonstrates that the organized movement is a vehicle for a radical leftist anti-Capitalist agenda, using "Black Lives" as the hook. The research is by Anne Sorock of The Frontier Lab using a "deep values" methodology. Several years ago Anne was a regular contributor to Legal Insurrection, but that has fallen off as she devoted herself The Frontier Lab. Deep values research is something pioneered by Dr. Brian Wansink at the Food & Brand Lab at Cornell University. Anne received her MBA at Cornell and worked with that group. Deep values research seeks to understand not just what consumers like or want, but what deeply held values lead to such decisions. At The Frontier Lab, Anne applies those research methods to politics.

It's sobering to see such staggering ignorance about free speech and freedom in general on display on American campuses this week. The special snowflakes of the Snowflake Protests (Yale, Mizzou, etc.) are providing a window into the results of the progressive takeover of our education system -- from pre-school all the way on up to college and beyond. (Common Core will just streamline the process a little more.) Alarming, but in keeping with findings about Americans' demand for freedom, or lack thereof, detailed in The Frontier Lab's recent study, "Freedom Buzz." Ask Americans about freedom, as we did in this study, and you get what seem like familiar responses: freedom is the American Dream, the ability to worship and speak freely, or to choose your own path in life. Pretty standard. Nearly 100 hours of research interviews, and a national survey to test the findings, revealed two trends in how many Americans perceive the value of freedom.

April, the month when the sting of the government's overreach is most acute, provided the backdrop for a series of infographics illustrating just how onerous the tax burden (and fiscal irresponsibility) is to our country. Groups like the Cato Institute, AFP, Illinois Policy Institute, and...

A professor at Harvard has applied her behavioral science background to the use of the "sequestration" tactic in an article, "The Strange Behavioral Logic of the Sequester Stalemate." She uses the somewhat forced nature of the upcoming automatic spending cuts and compares elements of the situation...

There's a surplus of pretty successful infographics attempting to sway audiences as to the meaning--and import--of sequestration cuts.

From political groups like Third Way and The Democratic Daily to a Quaker organization and the Cato Institute, there are common themes running through many of the depictions that attempt to both explain the term "sequestration," while also selling a viewpoint. The infographics from those opposed to sequestration focus on what, and even more strikingly, who, will be impacted according to their points-of-view. On the other hand, an infographic from the Cato Institute focused on placing the cut amounts in perspective--and using humor.

For example, National Parks Service presents perceived impact on jobs, and converts figures into "equivalents," saying "proposed cuts to NPS budget would be equivalent to close 200 of the smallest park units":

The Third Way attempts to reach out across the aisle to Tea Party activists, choosing issues they think are interesting to them and applying their left-leaning ideological POV:

Democratic Daily goes straight for the jugular, illustrating the impact on children:

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