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    EPA Rolls Out New Coal Rules That Will Save Money, Reduce Pollution

    EPA Rolls Out New Coal Rules That Will Save Money, Reduce Pollution

    “Today’s proposal provides the states and regulated community the certainty they need to continue environmental progress.”

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lbI5AoWP3fk

    Andrew Wheeler, the acting head of the EPA, signed a proposal that will undo President Barack Obama’s Clean Power Plan and establish new rules for coal plants. From The Washington Examiner:

    The Environmental Protection Agency on Tuesday morning released its plan, renamed the “Affordable Clean Energy Rule,” that the agency said would provide $400 million in annual benefits, while reducing carbon emission levels by up to 1.5 percent by 2030. President Trump is expected to tout the new rule at a rally in coal-friendly West Virginia Tuesday night.

    “The ACE Rule would restore the rule of law and empower states to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and provide modern, reliable, and affordable energy for all Americans,” said EPA Acting Administrator Andrew Wheeler. “Today’s proposal provides the states and regulated community the certainty they need to continue environmental progress while fulfilling President Trump’s goal of energy dominance.”

    The STATES. Yes, the power will go back to the states. From The Wall Street Journal (emphasis mine):

    While the proposal meets many of the headline demands the coal industry has made for years, Mr. Wheeler, himself a former coal industry lobbyist, denied it is designed specifically to save coal. Instead, he stressed the effort gives the states authority to make determinations on which fuels should be part of their electricity system to ensure reliable power and clean air.

    Every state is different. Like people, you cannot treat all states the same way.

    The Wall Street Journal reviewed the plan:

    The new plan, an advance copy of which was reviewed by The Wall Street Journal, recommends a menu of upgrades designed to let coal-fired plants produce energy with less fuel and seeks to eliminate triggers that mandate costly technological overhauls at coal plants. While the Clean Power Plan was designed to reduce greenhouse gases and fight the cause of climate change, the Trump administration cast the regulation as setting unfair rules that coal plants wouldn’t be able to meet.

    “The entire Obama administration plan was centered around doing away with coal,” Mr. Wheeler said in an interview.

    Now before anyone gets all outragey over this, it looks like the plan will reduce coal consumption like Obama’s plan, but “at a slower rate.” Besides, no one ever implemented Obama’s Clean Power Plan due to a Supreme Court stay.

    It also appears that power companies won’t change their ways as they “have already said they expect to keep up a large-scale shift to cleaner fuels increasingly demanded by their customers.” Natural gas remains cheaper than coal, too.

    David Doniger, who worked as the director of climate change policy under President Bill Clinton, told WSJ that these “policies are not going to bring back coal.”

    This news is great for President Donald Trump as he heads to West Virginia to campaign for Attorney General Patrick Morrisey’s run against incumbent Democrat Joe Manchin.

    [Featured image via YouTube]

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    Comments


    The EPA rolled out another study that seems to be a companion of these new rules. It carries the heady title “Regulatory Impact Analysis for the Proposed Emission Guidelines for Greenhouse Gas Emissions from Existing Electric Utility Generating Units; Revisions to Emission Guideline Implementing Regulations; Revisions to New Source Review Program.”

    It is being used by the enviro-activists to show how the new rules are going to kill everyone. However; buried in the report is the fun little disclaimer:

    As previously stated, this analysis is intended to be illustrative, and not intended to evaluate the many specific approaches that individual states might choose as they implement BSER, or how sources might have responded to those specific policy signals or requirements. It is important to note, that EPA has not analyzed or modeled a specific standard of performance, given that this proposal establishes BSER, and it is up to states to determine appropriate standards of performance for sources. It is important to note that there is inadequate and incomplete information regarding how states might specifically implement this rule, and the estimated range of costs and impacts presented in this chapter is based on the assumptions described above.

    Sigh. Same ol’ crap, that unless it’s being done by the bureaucrats in DC it doesn’t count.


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