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    Joe Paterno statue removed in advance of Monday’s NCAA sanctions

    Joe Paterno statue removed in advance of Monday’s NCAA sanctions

    A statue of former Penn State coach Joe Paterno was taken down Sunday from outside the university’s football stadium. A report from Louis Freeh that detailed the far-reaching coverup of child sex abuse by Jerry Sandusky led the university to remove the statue, announced earlier Sunday morning in a statement:

    Throughout Penn State, the two most visible memorials to Coach Paterno are the statue at Beaver Stadium and the Paterno Library. The future of these two landmarks has been the topic of heated debate and many messages have been received in various University offices, including my own. We have heard from numerous segments of the Penn State community and others, many of whom have differing opinions. These are particularly important decisions when considering things that memorialize such a revered figure.

    I now believe that, contrary to its original intention, Coach Paterno’s statue has become a source of division and an obstacle to healing in our University and beyond. For that reason, I have decided that it is in the best interest of our university and public safety to remove the statue and store it in a secure location. I believe that, were it to remain, the statue will be a recurring wound to the multitude of individuals across the nation and beyond who have been the victims of child abuse.

    The famed statue of Joe Paterno was taken down from outside the Penn State football stadium Sunday, eliminating a key piece of the iconography surrounding the once-sainted football coach accused of burying child sex abuse allegations against a retired assistant.

    The NCAA announced they will detail sanctions against the university at 9am eastern on Monday:

    A high-ranking NCAA source said, “I’ve never seen anything like it,” according to CBS News, which first reported the sanctions.

    ESPN reported that announcement will not be the NCAA’s well known “death penalty,” but it will include deep scholarship cuts and loss of bowl eligibility for many years.

    The announcement will be made at 9 a.m. ET Monday in Indianapolis by NCAA president Mark Emmert and Ed Ray, chairman of the NCAA’s executive committee, according to a statement….

    The NCAA has handed down the death penalty — which shuts down a program for a year — once, to SMU in 1986. However, a source told ESPN that Monday’s penalties could be more crippling than a death penalty.

    University cultures that overemphasize sports in the academic environment are perhaps more susceptible to these warped institutional decisions that set aside the original missions of their schools. Penn State, founded in 1855 as an agricultural school, operates with the mission to educate “students from Pennsylvania, the nation and the world, and improves the well being and health of individuals and communities through integrated programs of teaching, research, and service.”

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    Comments



     
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    katiejane | July 22, 2012 at 6:16 pm

    I assume Penn State will also return the 4 million dollars the Paterno family donated over the years. To do otherwise would be hypocritical.


       
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      WarEagle82 in reply to katiejane. | July 22, 2012 at 9:09 pm

      When JoPa writes a letter asking for his money back, I am sure Penn State will return the funds. I suggest they write him a check and slip it under his headstone.


     
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    Aggie95 | July 22, 2012 at 7:34 pm

    I am not arguing for or against but I know that any sanctions are going to badly hurt the good and decent people of State College. We had a meeting of our Republican district officers today and our Chair said that they estimate that just the football program brings in about 160,000,000 a year to the businesses of central PA gas, food , lodging etc ….God help them if the Penn State is barred from all sports or even just football


       
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      Jenny in reply to Aggie95. | July 22, 2012 at 8:07 pm

      The scorched earth solutions being suggested do little to bring justice to anyone, but harm scores of innocent people who had nothing to do with the abuse of Sandusky victims.


         
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        WarEagle82 in reply to Jenny. | July 23, 2012 at 12:04 am

        So the alternative is to do nothing?

        There is a big stinking pile of corruption on the campus of Penn State.

        It won’t go away by ignoring the smell…


     
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    Estragon | July 22, 2012 at 7:58 pm

    Under what NCAA rule are these sanctions to be applied?

    I think the lawbreakers should be prosecuted as appropriate. I don’t think we should be making up new laws, rules, or procedures to feed a sense of public vengeance.

    And in general with violations, shouldn’t penalties follow the perpetrators instead of just the school? Often the offending athletes and coaches just go somewhere else, while the innocent who remain at the scene of the crime pay the entire price.


       
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      Milwaukee in reply to Estragon. | July 22, 2012 at 8:40 pm

      A good bet would be that we have not seen all of the criminal or civil legal actions regarding Sandusky and Penn State. Why would the NCAA need to do something now, when criminal action is still a possibility against members of the administration?


       
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      WarEagle82 in reply to Estragon. | July 22, 2012 at 9:06 pm

      In general, I agree that NCAA penalties need to cover schools and the individuals to violate NCAA rules. All too many times, the schools get hammered and the coaches and ADs simply walk away with millions in their pockets and take another position a year or two later.

      I suspect the problem is that the NCAA has no effective ability to punish private citizens violating NCAA rules and that is the reason they haven’t done so.

      But in this case, the NCAA can’t do anything to Sandusky or Paterno. Neither is likely to be looking for a coaching slot any time soon.


         
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        Milwaukee in reply to WarEagle82. | July 22, 2012 at 9:52 pm

        I think Jerry Tarkanian helped on out this when he left Long Beach for UNLV. Long Beach was left with the punishment, and he was somewhere else. Seems that NCAA does have a way to punish coaches who violate their regulations, even if the coaches relocate.


           
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          WarEagle82 in reply to Milwaukee. | July 22, 2012 at 10:22 pm

          Tarkanian spent most of his career as a Division I coach in a battle with the NCAA. After he left Long Beach State, its basketball program was slapped with probation for recruiting violations which occurred under his watch.

          Just months before the 1976–77 season, the NCAA placed UNLV on two years’ probation for “questionable practices.” Although the alleged violations dated back to 1971—before Tarkanian became coach—the NCAA pressured UNLV into suspending Tarkanian as coach for two years. Tarkanian sued, claiming the suspension violated his right to due process. In September 1977, a Nevada judge issued an injunction which reinstated Tarkanian as coach. The case eventually made it all the way to the Supreme Court of the United States, which ruled in 1988 that the NCAA had the right to discipline its member schools, reversing the 1977 injunction.

          In the decade between the original suspension and the Supreme Court ruling, it was revealed that the NCAA’s enforcement process was stacked heavily in the NCAA’s favor—so heavily, in fact, that it created a perception that there was no due process. The enforcement staff was allowed to build cases on hearsay, and shared few of their findings with the targeted school. The resulting negative publicity led the NCAA to institute a clearer separation between the enforcement staff and the infractions committee, as well as a system for appeals. Also, hearsay evidence was no longer admissible in infractions cases.

          After being fired from the Spurs, Tarkanian sued the NCAA, claiming it had harassed him for over two decades. The harassment, Tarkanian claimed, started when he wrote a newspaper column alleging that the NCAA was more willing to punish less-prominent schools than big-name schools. Although the NCAA did not admit harassing Tarkanian, it settled out of court in 1998, paying him $2.5 million.

          Evidently, the NCAA has attempted to punish coaches but it doesn’t always seem to work effectively. The NCAA paid Tark $2.5 million to settle a legal matter.

          But a quick google search indicates a lot of coaches get suspended for a few games by the NCAA. I can’t find a list of such suspensions though.

          And I don’t recall any coach from a major school getting suspended for an entire season or more recently. Pete Carroll walked away from USC and went to the pros. Not much the NCAA can do in cases like that.

          Like I said, there seems to be no effective ability to sanction the individuals in cases like this…


     
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    Richard Aubrey | July 22, 2012 at 8:13 pm

    Early on there were suggestions that some group affiliated with PSU was procuring boys for big donors. May or not be related. I don’t believe Freeh found anything of the sort.
    However, should this be true, the exposure at PSU will provide a kind of venue for the boys in question to come forward.
    And this admin is the one that cleared Mann and his hockey stick.


       
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      BannedbytheGuardian in reply to Richard Aubrey. | July 22, 2012 at 9:45 pm

      I think you might have some mix ups there. I do not recall anything about procurements for BIG Donors specifically.

      Jerry Sandusky sponsored The Second Mile Foundation some of whose kids attended football related activities at PSU. Then it gets murky .


       
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      Milwaukee in reply to Richard Aubrey. | July 22, 2012 at 9:56 pm

      “Early on there were suggestions that some group affiliated with PSU was procuring boys for big donors. May or not be related. I don’t believe Freeh found anything of the sort.”

      What was Freeh asked to look at? Was he asked “What did administrators know about Sandusky violating children on Penn State property, and when did they know it?” If that’s the case, then the issue you remind us of may not have been investigated. Which may mean that it needs more investigation. When and why did that district attorney die? There’s a lot more here that needs explaining.


         
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        WarEagle82 in reply to Milwaukee. | July 22, 2012 at 11:44 pm

        Freeh also found no evidence that Martin Borman, Adolf Hitler and Josef Mengele were performing a transvestite cabaret act in Buenos Aires.

        He also found no additional information about the “grassy knoll,” bigfoot, the Loch Ness Monster or dead aliens in Area 51.

        It is amazing what Free overlooked. Has anyone investigated Free and his relationship with Sandusky? After all, his report made no mention of that either…


     
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    DocWahala | July 22, 2012 at 11:55 pm

    I agree with Rags…they did the right thing.

    And if you want to ask me why I think so, just keep in mind, whatever answer I give, “doing the right thing” is not validated or invalidated by either of our opinions.

    As for slamming on Rags… he’s not the one you should be asking why it is right or wrong – in fact, the answer is in the letter.

    DocWahala


       
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      BannedbytheGuardian in reply to DocWahala. | July 23, 2012 at 2:48 am

      Although Rags got to be 2nd responder only 4 posts were in reply. If you had read all the posts you would see Rags was not the star attraction nor the villain nor a victim .

      Some posters have been on his subject since the very beginning. In fact I might have even mentioned it before the first specific posts amongst the early Santorum LI “vetting”.

      I still believe Santorum should apologize for giving Sandusky The Congress Angel of Adoption award . It is not as if he did not have deep PA contacts plus being a PSU grad.


         
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        DocWahala in reply to BannedbytheGuardian. | July 23, 2012 at 4:22 am

        Thanks Banned…. however, when I posted my note, there weren’t 69 replies. Why it got hung up in the net, I don’t know, and I really don’t care.

        So, before anyone says “if you would have read the rest of the posts” might want to rethink that one.

        See you on the flip side, have a nice day.

        DocWahala


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