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    Pawlenty endorses Romney

    Pawlenty endorses Romney

    In a post at NRO, praising Romney without bashing other Republican candidates:

    But he’s not only a family man, he is a man of principle. He believes in the bedrock conservative ideals of limited government and free enterprise. He will stand up for America’s allies when they are threatened, with fortitude. And he will face down our adversaries. He is a formidable person, and he will certainly be a formidable president. Our allies can count on it, and our enemies should expect it.

    I don’t think this means a lot in terms of votes for Romney, but it certainly is a plus, particularly to the extent it gives Romney another high profile Republican to campaign for him and help raise money.

    It also reflects the continuing divide between the traditional Republican leadership and the upstarts. I viewed Pawlenty as someone who could bridge that gap, but it wasn’t to be.

    While I don’t think this in and of itself is a huge event, it does signal a coalescing around Romney of a traditional segment of the party which was neither inside-the-beltway nor Tea Party.  That seems to be the territory Romney is mining.

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    […] » Pawlenty endorses Romney – Le·gal In·sur·rec·tion I don’t think this means a lot in terms of votes for Romney, but it certainly is a plus, particularly to the extent it gives Romney another high profile Republican to campaign for him and help raise money. […]


     
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    StephenMonteith | September 12, 2011 at 10:19 am

    I think Pawlenty’s endorsement comes with more weight than you would think. Remember, despite his lack of support, he still had a great organization going in Iowa. Romney’s own organization isn’t as profound as it was four years ago, so he’ll need all the help he can get there, if he’s indeed serious about campaigning in the caucus (which I believe he is).

    Likewise, the whole Midwest is up for grabs right now. Without Haley Barbour or Mitch Daniels in the race, that whole swath is going to be highly competitive. Who knows whether Minnesota’s former governor will be able to appeal to that area on Romney’s behalf? Remember, he never really got a chance to campaign outside of Iowa.

    “He believes in the bedrock conservative ideals of limited government and free enterprise.”

    How is it possible to reconcile this claim with Romneycare?

    Answer: It isn’t possible. Romney believes in limited government only as long as the polls tell him to.


       
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      Midwest Rhino (not RINO) in reply to irv. | September 12, 2011 at 11:01 am

      The polls are overwhelmingly for limited government, so as long as Romney listens, perhaps that is OK. Perry is listening also. I might like him better, not for sure yet.

      Democrats have mastered the art of ruling AGAINST the will of the people. They use polls to shape their propaganda, not to do the will of the people.

      Newt’s debate synopsis of what all the Republicans stand together for, might fit the Tea Party label well. The media/Democrats want to divide and conquer. The Tea Party has a big tent. We’re all Tea Partiers now.

      It is convenient to divide the Republicans into “more tea partyish and not”, but that seems to fall into the Democrat scheme.


       
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      khan in reply to irv. | September 12, 2011 at 11:44 am

      None of the candidates favor limited government except Ron Paul. Look at the kerfuffle over Social Security, and look at how many of these so-called conservatives are rushing to say how it must be saved. It’s a liberal dream of wealth redistribution, and they all want to keep the status quo.

    When National Review endorsed Romney 2008 they went from “standing athwart Liberals yelling stop” to “standing with Liberals yelling Government MANDATES”

    NR is a Cult of William F. Buckley’s Ghost.

    But wait…the “traditional leadership?” Why isn’t the 10-year Governor of Texas who was before that the lieutenant governor and before that the elected agriculture commissioner, not to mention that until about 20 years ago, he was a Democrat, part of the “traditional leadership” too?

    Is everyone so easily manipulated that wearing cowboy boots and calling Social Security a Ponzi scheme can turn an establishment guy into an “upstart?”


       
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      WarEagle82 in reply to JEBurke. | September 12, 2011 at 1:49 pm

      Ronal Reagan was once a Democrat so that alone doesn’t cause me undo concern about Perry. However, Rick Perry is certainly an establishment politician. And he is no Ronald Reagan.

      I am not saying I won’t support Perry but he looks much too much like a big government, compasionate conservative, establishment Republican at this point.


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